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Fishing

  • Specks bite sporadic, drum strong

    The cold weather showed up in full force over the Thanksgiving holiday, making nearly perfect conditions to send lots of ducks our way and really bunch up our fish.
    I went out of town for Thanksgiving and did not return to the beach until late Thursday night. The fishing conditions looked pretty good to do some scouting Friday morning.

  • Speckled trout action continues in nice weather

    The weather could not have been more beautiful this past weekend. The winds were calm with air temperatures holding right around 70 degrees. It is kind of crazy to think it was snowing earlier in the week.

  • Local teams dominate national fishing competition

    Brunswick County once again has shown itself as the center of the king mackerel fishermen’s universe, taking first- and second-place in the Southern Kingfish Association’s National Championship tournament.

  • Cold weather brings speck-tacular action in inshore fishing

    High pressure building around the Great Lakes region is sending us another shot of cold air. Many of us complain about the cold air and I will admit it takes some getting used to. A blast of cold air has some serious benefits, too. Fishermen and hunters alike know this will send lots of ducks our way, deer will walk more often and the fish will tighten up in larger schools. Where will all the cold air send the fish?

  • Watch for blue tails waving like a flag

    The combination of light winds and slack tidal current let the water clear up nicely last week. These conditions allowed us to see schools of reds working along the grass edges weaving through the oyster beds. Sometimes just seeing these schools of redfish is enough and catching them is just icing on the cake.

  • Watch for blue tails waving like a flag

    The combination of light winds and slack tidal current let the water clear up nicely last week. These conditions allowed us to see schools of reds working along the grass edges weaving through the oyster beds. Sometimes just seeing these schools of redfish is enough and catching them is just icing on the cake.

  • Wahoo lead fishing headlines

    Wahoo — I wonder who came up with that name? If fishermen named everything by the reaction it gave us, we’d have names like “frustrateds,” “holy cows” and “dagnabbits.” They are appropriate names for when a fish bites the line, your reel goes into a high-speed scream and you achieve an instant adrenaline rush.

  • Slow, steady and stealth are the keys

    Cold fronts continue pushing through our area bringing northerly winds that greatly benefit our fishery. Brunswick County beaches are south facing and with a north wind are protected by the land, making for calm seas near the beach. Calm seas close to the beach mean the surf is calm and not stirring up lots of silt.

  • Fall fishing is at full throttle

    I have been talking about the thrill of fall fishing for the past 15 years in which I have been writing this column. Our area is not known as a world-class fishing destination, but I have traveled worldwide to experience fishing action and Brunswick County is a world-class fishing destination during the month of October. Whether you are fishing red drum, king mackerel or wahoo, there is a wide variety of high-profile game fish ready to provide angling action. Furthermore, this variety of fishing offers boats of various sizes the opportunity to access the great fishing.

  • Anglers enjoying the redfish blitz

    The prevailing winds have changed to the northeast, bringing the cooler temperatures that are expected for this time of year. We will experience only a few more warmer days this year when strong fronts approach and the winds switch out of the south temporarily.