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Fishing

  • Don’t hang up your fishing rods yet

    It sure is quiet down on the coast this fall. In the midst of possibly the world’s worst economic downturn, the only ones making out to the good are the fish.

    The other problem we’ve had is the wind. It seems day after day the wind blows, changes direction and then blows again. It is only supposed to blow for a couple of days, then settle down for a couple of days. Combine the unsettled weather and dismal economy and you have the recipe for rebuilding fish stocks.

  • Don’t let the winter chill deter you

    Fishing has improved for some folks this week as anglers are beginning to focus on traditionally cold-weather species. Fish such as black and red drum, whiting and speckled trout will still provide a lot of action for folks as the fishing season comes to an end.

    One winter fish that has already made a surge is the black drum. Black drum can be caught all year, but they really come to the forefront in the colder months. They are among our most dependable fish when a lot of better-known species have left for warmer waters or aren’t biting in the cold.

  • Weather and fish cooperate for Fall Brawl King Classic tournament

    The annual Yellowfin/OIFC.com Fall Brawl King Classic was postponed from its original weekend dates of Oct. 24-26 to Oct. 31-Nov. 2. Mother Nature decided the original dates were not to her liking, but fortunately for the 178 boats that registered and competed on the postponed dates, the weather and fish cooperated to make for a great tournament.

  • Fall season perplexing for inshore fishermen

    It’s been a less-than-spectacular fall season so far for most inshore fishermen. After a good year overall, I had high hopes, but the fishing season has not really kicked into gear. The lack of a protracted spot run has been the biggest worry, although fishing for everything else has been unusually hit-and-miss for autumn in southern North Carolina.

    The best fishing has probably been for red drum in the shallow areas or bluefish wherever you find them. The blues won’t last much longer as they aren’t a cold-weather fish, but the drum will stay around all year.

  • Season for spot has been hit-and-miss so far

    Halloween is upon us, and folks are still out there trying to scare up some spot for dinner. They are fishing in increasingly colder weather, as everyone hopes to arrive at the water just when the spot run really kicks into gear. So far it has been another hit and miss season for spot, something becoming familiar to anglers on the southeastern coast.

  • Late fall fishing transition begins as temperatures cool

    And now to the next phase of the fishing experience. Late fall has officially arrived as temperatures this week plummet into the 30s. Beach water temperatures have fallen to the mid-60s and the fish are on the move. The spots will be running at their peak over the next week or two. Watch for the piers to be lined with fishermen facing north as a sign the bite is on.

  • Ready, set, wait—for fall fishing

    I am really starting to annoy myself with my own writing. Week after week I’ve reported how the fishing is “just about to crank up,” “almost here.” Yet here we are, still waiting. However, I can’t take the blame as Mother Nature has been throwing curveballs at us fishermen for the past several weeks.

  • Autumn is a great time of year for fishermen

    We have had storms and yellow butterflies, now all local anglers are waiting on are the fish.

    September gave us a blustery start to the fall fishing season, and while fish were caught, we haven’t seen the best of autumn yet. Inshore anglers will be out in force this month looking for an exclamation point on what has so far been a good year for recreational fishermen.

  • Fall fishing has arrived in Brunswick County

    Finally, the water has cleared, the air has cooled, the north winds are blowing and it is time to go fishing.

  • Dispelling myths about fish and fishing--the truth according to Weeks

    With the fall fishing season just about upon us, it is time to re-examine our local inshore fishing myths. I have addressed some of these before, but since they crop up every autumn, now is a good time to dust them off and either debunk or certify them. Once the fish start hitting, I’m in it for myself and I’m not telling you anything.