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Fishing

  • Anglers seem to be cashing in away from the bank and finding the fish in deep water

    To watch the average bass tournament, the outcome is so often decided on who finds the best stretch of bank. But what happens when the shallow bite isn’t there? Where do you go when the fish have closed the bank?

  • Live bait will snare sluggish fish even during summer heat

    It is a strange year for fishing when you can’t seem to talk about fish without talking about gasoline. Gas prices have become like the prices for a pack of live bloodworms: up and down, different in different places, but always outrageously high. If one day the price of a gallon of gas surpasses that of a bag of bloodworms, then nobody is going to be able to leave the house.

  • Sometimes it is better to be lucky than good when fishing

    There’s a common saying among tournament fishermen, “I’d rather be lucky than good.” If you are a fisherman you understand exactly what this means. So much of fishing is about circumstance. Right place, right time and then having the fish bite your line instead of someone’s beside you. Also the factors that lead up to catching a particular fish can be a tangled web of fortune and misfortune, but somehow you end up where you are and then the fish bites. As such, let me tell you the story of one of the most unbelievable days of fishing in my life.

  • Speckled trout, pompano best bets for summertime fishing

    Inshore fishing has settled into a summertime pattern, which means while angling in the heat of the day isn’t going to be your best bet, there are plenty of fish out there to be caught. A lot of bait is in the water now, and you can bet that many of these little critters are being gobbled up by something. A noticeable continuation in the speckled trout fishing and strong showings of some big pompano are the best things going, but other species are out there for the catching as well.

  • Area fishing continues steady

    We have settled into what I refer to as the early summer pattern, which typically runs from late June through July. This is, in my opinion, one of our peak times to fish from the area because of all the variety. The majority of the fishing I do during this time is in the 55- to 70-foot depth range, where you will find good numbers of king mackerel in the 15- to 20-pound range, with dolphin, sailfish and cobia mixed in.

  • Cranked up about fluorocarbon and deep water fishing

    If you respool your reels as much as I do, I hope you stocked up on some extra fluorocarbon line recently, because it’s summer and you’re going to need it.

  • Flounder stay active inshore even as temperatures continue to rise

    The hot summer is not known as a time of great inshore fishing, but there is one fish you can go after no matter how hot it gets. Flounder are still active in our waters and some can even be caught in the hottest part of the day. You just have to remember a few simple suggestions about how to target these tasty flatfish, and your fishing season won’t melt away with the sun.

  • Shore fishing a quick and easy option for saltwater anglers

    A few years back I wrote that saltwater shore fishermen never get any respect. Since the price of a gallon of gas is now rivaling the price of the Hope Diamond, things may be changing. Hauling a boat down to the ramp and launching for a day of fishing is still great fun, unless you have to do certain things like eating. So, fishing from the sand or pier may be making a comeback even among those who have those pretty boats sitting in the front yard. Don’t worry, if you’re on dry land or wading into the water, you can still catch fish.

  • A bittersweet Jolly Mon King Classic

    This past weekend the annual Jolly Mon King Classic took place from the Ocean Isle Fishing Center. This tournament has proved over the years to be one of the region’s favorite and most-attended events, due in part to its pick-your-fishing day format, fishing boundaries and family-oriented atmosphere and prizes. However, with gas prices approaching $5 a gallon and a general pessimistic fiscal attitude, I expected the event’s participation to be severely down.

  • Top tournament finishers battle mackerel, then storm

    The second- and third-place finishers in the Jolly Mon King Classic earned their money Saturday. After they landed their prize catches, they had to battle through a ferocious storm.

    Keith Logan aboard Logan’s Love finished second (36.65) and collected $7,750. He thanked Hunter McCray of the Rod and Reel Shop on Holden Beach. Logan fished in the Gen. Sherman Wreck area. Logan, of Longs, S.C., landed his king mackerel about 7:15 a.m.