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Cooking

  • Warmer weather means it’s time for chilled soups and salads

    Chilled soups are a great idea for these warmer days when you just want something light. And what would taste better than a cool salad made with cantaloupe and cucumber?

    When I started thinking about making some chilled soups, I came up with a few that are relatively easy to make with ingredients most of us have in the pantry or fridge — no going to the store for an ingredient or two that you probably won’t be using again until the kids leave home.

  • Even the rich and famous can enjoy a home-cooked meal

    Ever wonder how the rich and famous eat when they aren’t under the spotlight or just hanging out at home by themselves? No servants. No personal chefs. No caterers. What about those who hold the highest office in the land and call the White House home?

  • Italian pasta dishes come in a variety of sizes and shapes

    All great pasta dishes start with fresh ingredients. Fresh plump tomatoes, onions, basil, fresh cloves of garlic will make for a delicious and flavorful meal.

  • Pecans add a unique, rich taste to many foods

    With April being National Pecan Month, this is the perfect time to take advantage of the versatility of pecans and their health benefits at the same time.

    You can say PEE-can, PEE-kawn, pa-CAN or pa-KAWN. However, the overwhelming choice among Americans is PEE-can. Nearly half of all pecan consumers prefer this pronunciation of the all-American tree nut, while the rest of country is somewhat split between pa-KAWN and PEE-kawn.

  • Are liver pudding, livermush and scrapple the same thing?

    A popular Southern breakfast treat is livermush, or liver pudding. It is said to be one of the first pork foods made in America. It’s a flexible dish and makes an excellent breakfast alongside some fried or scrambled eggs.

    I grew up eating scrapple, said to have actually originated in the farmlands of eastern Pennsylvania. The word scrapple originated from “scrap” or “scrappy,” and consisted of ground leftover pig scraps that were boiled and then combined with cornmeal and other spices.

  • Roasted vegetables are the perfect side dish for any meal

    You cannot go wrong with roasted vegetables. They are the perfect side and make the best leftovers for a quick lunch the next day. Once you’ve tried roasting vegetables like beets, carrots, sweet potatoes, cauliflower, peppers, onions or asparagus, you’ll be serving them more often than not.

  • Keep dinner simple with these healthy 5-ingredient recipes

    Using fewer ingredients in your dishes still offers delicious taste and nutrition. There are few kitchen nightmares that are worse than finding a recipe that sounds so amazing, and then looking at the list of ingredients needed that seems longer than your phone’s contact list!

  • The celebration of Easter brings families together

    Thinking about Easter, I was just wondering how we got from the resurrection to stuffed Easter bunnies and marshmallow Peeps.

    It is believed the word Easter is derived from Oestar, or Eostre, the goddess of spring and renewal. Seems like the goddess was totally into spring celebrations, and so this annual tradition begins.

     

    Easter traditions

    During the middle ages, roast lamb became the traditional main course of the Pope’s Easter dinner, and it is still customarily served on Easter Sunday in many European countries.

  • Cincinnati chili is quite different from Southwestern-style chili

    In Cincinnati, a popular chili served over spaghetti is called Cincinnati chili, and the most popular local restaurant that serves this unique dish is called Skyline. Many people also refer to it as Skyline chili.

    My first indulgence into this Midwestern creation was back in Akron, Ohio, at the Waterloo Restaurant, just a few miles from Firestone Country Club where we frequently played golf at the Firestone North course, which was a public golf course back then. After a round of golf, we’d head to the Waterloo for some Cincinnati chili.

  • Green foods on St. Patrick’s Day? Not for me

    Saint Patrick’s Day will be celebrated worldwide this weekend. I know many of you like to make all kinds of crazy green-dyed food on this special day. I, for one, am not that fond of green colored foods, or even blue or purple colored foods.

    Some will argue that corned beef isn’t a “traditional” Irish meal, but it was quite popular with hard-working Irish immigrants who arrived in our country with limited means and low-paying jobs. Corned beef was cheap and affordable back then. Today, cabbage with bacon is a popular dish in Ireland.