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County Extension

  • Change your protein

    Editor’s note: Sixth in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”

     

  • How to successfully grow a vegetable garden

    One of the trendy things to do is have your own vegetable garden. You can grow what you want, the varieties you like and know exactly how everything has been treated.

    Unfortunately, that doesn’t guarantee your success in the challenging climate of southeastern North Carolina.

  • It takes two … fruits

    Editor’s note: Fifth in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”

     

    In last week’s column, I talked about the importance of vegetables in the Mediterranean-style way of eating. It’s hard to talk about vegetables without adding their partner: fruits.

  • Brief winter gardening respite is officially over

    Things are slowly changing in the garden as January winds down and the days are noticeably longer. The warmer weather has pushed the Japanese flowering apricots into bloom in shades of red, white and pink. The hybrid plum Blireana won’t be far behind. 

    But, a look around the garden reminds of the ravages of the cold as the New Year got started.  Rose leaves are clinging lifelessly to the thorny canes, the boxwoods are bronzed and the Meyer lemon foliage hangs flaccidly waiting for a strong breeze to send it wafting to the ground. 

  • Ground pearls plague turf

    The weather continues to dominate conversations of gardeners and non-gardeners alike. I’m not sure what happened to that prediction of “drier and warmer than normal” for this winter. At least we’re moving back into a more typical pattern.

    There’s nothing new to say about the cold weather and our plants. Yes, the sago palms and oleanders got bitten and will require some extra pruning. But, so far, there is no significant damage on other, well adapted trees and shrubs.

  • Add more veggies

    Editor’s note: Fourth in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”

     

    Eating a Mediterranean-style diet has been shown to reduce a person’s risk of chronic diseases. The basic concepts are to eat lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, more fish, nuts, beans, seeds and olive oil similar to traditional diets of people who live in the Mediterranean region.

  • The Big Freeze leaves impact on local gardens

    We survived The Big Freeze of 2018.  It’s not quite “hit the beach” weather this weekend, but at least the daytime temperatures are well above freezing.

  • Olive oil swap

    Editor’s note: Third in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”

     

  • Choose nuts instead

    Editor’s note: Second in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”

     

    I know this isn’t going to be a hard concept to sell, but here it goes: eat more nuts.

  • Mediterranean eating style

    Editor’s note: First in a series of eight columns on “Med instead of Meds.”

     

    Your resolution is to eat heathier in 2018. How are you going to do that? I have an idea that doesn’t involve excessive dieting, a major lifestyle change or unusual foods. This is eating the “med” way.