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Today's Features

  • LELAND—Leland officials are talking about creating a new downtown.

    Officials talked about development in a planning workshop Dec. 9-12.

    Town manager David Hollis said the town approved the Flexcode zoning in 2011 to promote the mixed-use development they want to encourage in downtown Leland.

    However, Flexcode zoning is optional. Developers have been able to consider traditional zoning for the area.

    Hollis said the town intends to make Flexcode standard zoning beginning in 2013.

  • Art students at Supply Elementary School recently created oversize decorative shears that will soon adorn the walls of a Shallotte hair salon.
    Third-, fourth- and fifth-grade students collaborated in art classes during the past few weeks to create scissors that won’t cut, but will add to the ambiance at Shear MaDDness.

  • WINGS Ministry’s Backpack Full of Blessings program strives to do on the weekends what school breakfast and lunch programs do all week—keep kids from going hungry.

    Blessings organizer Missy Settlemyre said they are trying to make Brunswick County residents aware of the need here. She would like to see every school served by the program.

  • LELAND—Leland police provided Grannies Raising Grandkids with a day to shop with a cop Sunday.

    And the department’s Christmas cheer continues when they play Santa Cop Dec. 23-24.

    “We had four grandmas with 10 grandkids between them,” Leland community resource and crime prevention officer Ernie Mejia said.

    Police chief Mike James spearheaded the department’s participation with Grannies Raising Grandkids.

  • The Lockwood Folly community said goodbye to its property owners association president by naming a community park after him.

    Gordon Ackley Park was dedicated Dec. 1.

    “He was extremely involved in the community. He knew every blade of grass; he knew the history, he knew all the people,” said Joe Geise, president of the Lockwood Folly POA who served as vice president under Ackley.

    Geise said Ackley’s goal was to make Lockwood Folly’s POA the model of how a POA should operate in North Carolina.

  • After scrounging around the kitchen for one last holiday goodie, you find a single sugar cookie hiding in the bottom tin. You grab it, and head toward the mountain of decorations that need to be packed away until next year. Several hours later, the last box has been shoved into the attic or garage.
    Surveying the house, you see that all the gifts have been put away and everything appears to be back to normal…finally. And then you spot it, shouting at you from the bathroom floor…your old friend, the scale.

  • Eat a variety of foods from the protein foods group each week. Experiment with main dishes made with beans or peas, nuts, soy and seafood.
    Choose lean or low-fat cuts of meat like round or sirloin and ground beef that is at least 90 percent lean. Trim or drain fat from meat and remove poultry skin.
    Try grilling, broiling, roasting or baking. They don’t add extra fat. Some lean meats need slow, moist cooking to be tender. Try a slow cooker for them. Avoid breading meat or poultry, which adds calories.

  • By Judy Koehly
    Master Gardener
    Combine annuals, bulbs, perennials and shrubs; no one plant should have to do all of the work. Plant your beds with a backbone of perennials, shrubs and bulbs. These plants provide permanent color in your garden. Leave some open spaces that you can fill with annuals for all-summer color. Because perennials, shrubs and bulbs don’t need to be planted each year, spring planting takes less time.

  • Candlelight services set for Christmas Eve
    Trinity United Methodist Church, 209 E. Nash St. in Southport, will host four candlelight communion services on Christmas Eve.
    The 4 p.m. service in Murrow Hall is designed for family worship. There will also be a 6 p.m. service in Murrow Hall. The 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. services will be in the sanctuary.

  • Holidays are the time for traditions. Special holiday foods are some of the biggest traditions of all. Unfortunately, these foods may include some risky products or cooking methods that might result in a food-borne illness.
    Salmonella food poisoning might happen after eating raw or undercooked eggs. Even eggs with clean, uncracked shells may occasionally contain the salmonella bacteria. Researchers say that, if present, most bacteria are usually in the yolk, but it also has been found in the white, but not as often.