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Today's Features

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Susan Brooke Alexander and Mark Byron Shapiro, both of Seattle, Wash. The bride-elect is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Alexander of Shallotte. She is a graduate of Savannah College of Art and Design and founded Susabella Inc., a graphic and Web design firm in Seattle. The prospective groom is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Ronald Shapiro of Spokane, Wash. He is a graduate of the University of Puget Sound and owner of a State Farm insurance agency in Marysville, Wash. A July 4 wedding is planned in Seattle.

  • Dr. and Mrs. Bradford Fipps of Liberty, S.C., announce the engagement of their daughter, Laura Claire Fipps, to Scott Edward Bryson of Kannapolis. The prospective groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bryson Jr., of Brevard. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lane of Holden Beach and Betty Fipps of Tabor City. She is a senior at Southern Wesleyan University in Central, S.C. A 2006 graduate of Southern Wesleyan University, the prospective groom is the director of music at Kannapolis First Wesleyan Church.

  • Francis (Frank) Lewis and Mary Lewis celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Jan. 11. They were married in Yuma, Ariz., on Jan. 11, 1958. The Lewises have six children and four grandchildren. Their children gave them a surprise anniversary reception Jan. 10 at Ocean View Baptist Church, where 125 friends and family attended. Their son Kenneth Lewis made a three-tier wedding cake with yellow roses and a fountain for the celebration. Their sons Kenneth, James, Billy and Alan and daughter Patricia gave them a cruise to the Bahamas.

  • As Americans become increasingly overweight, scientists are finding more and more links between obesity and health. Weight management means adopting a lifestyle that includes a healthy eating plan and regular physical activity. Here are some tips to get you started:

    Accept Yourself

    Don’t compare yourself to images in magazines, on TV or in movies. They may be unrealistic and unhealthy. Find alternative methods to improve the things you do not like about yourself. We are all unique, so develop your own image and keep a positive attitude.

    Make a Commitment

  • Although it’s still too early to plant such popular garden vegetables such as tomatoes, beans and corn, it’s just the right time for Coastal Carolina gardeners to plant cool-season vegetables.

  • Now is the time of the year to start preparing for spring. One of the best activities any gardener in this area can accomplish is applying horticultural oil.

    The following article was furnished by Horticultural Agent Theresa Friday:

    February and early March is an ideal time to apply horticultural oil to your ornamental trees, shrubs and fruit trees to control scale and several other over-wintering insects. However, to prevent harm to your plant, it is important to understand how horticultural oils work and their limitations.

  • Pesticide class set

    Cape Fear Community College North Campus, 4500 Blue Clay Road in Castle Hayne, will present Pro Day–Prelude to March Madness on Wednesday, Feb. 27.

    Pesticide recertification credits will be available in aquatics, right-of-way, dealer, ornamentals and turf and private "X" categories.

    Contact the Brunswick County Cooperative Extension Service for more information at 253-2610.

    Coastal Gardener show

    Join Al Hight every Saturday morning on the Big Talker FM (106.3 and 93.7) from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. for the Coastal Gardener.

  • Even though it’s still early, our gardens are beginning to awaken from their short winter slumber. I’ve noticed new growth on daylilies and Knockout roses already.

    If a bit of new growth doesn’t quite chase away your winter blahs, consider adding Japanese flowering apricot to your garden. It always blooms in January and February in shades of white, pink and red.

  • During winter many species of migratory songbirds stay in our area while close and distant relatives head to the Caribbean and South America. This article is about three of the best “little guys” you may find this winter in your backyard or in nearby woods.

    Mostly they breed in northern boreal forest and eat insects plus insect larvae and eggs. How do they survive in Brunswick County in winter? Well, we still have insects during winter. Also, these songbirds shift to berries, sap, and seed when insects are not active.

  • Brunswick County Animal Services has received an “approved” status following an inspection at the shelter last week.

    Animal services director Richard Cooper said a state inspector was impressed with the shelter’s new air conditioning units that have been installed in the dog kennel area, as well as the overall condition of the shelter, after the Feb. 6 inspection.