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Today's News

  • Even the rich and famous can enjoy a home-cooked meal

    Ever wonder how the rich and famous eat when they aren’t under the spotlight or just hanging out at home by themselves? No servants. No personal chefs. No caterers. What about those who hold the highest office in the land and call the White House home?

  • What is this mystery plant?

    By John Nelson

  • Mary Eagan celebrates 95th birthday

    Mary Eagan of Arbor Landing at Ocean Isle turned 95 on May 3. A party was hosted in her honor April 28 by her children in Oyster Harbour, Holden Beach, where one daughter resides. She has seven children, 21 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren. More than 67 members of her family attended. Her birthday was also celebrated at lunch in Arbor Landing and at Planet Fun where she plays bridge every Friday.

  • Eight uncomfortable things to help you grow

    By Linda Arnold

     

    Let’s face it: growth and comfort do not coexist. 

    And the level of discomfort that needs to occur in order to make a change is different for each of us.

    As humans, we’re not necessarily “wired” for instant change. Whether it’s something that’s pushing you or pulling on you, it generally takes a big catalyst to get into major action for change.

  • When gratitude holds hands with grief

    Each day my email box bears a special gift. It’s a delivery from Daily Good: News that Inspires. Just the title is enough to promote a positive attitude, even if the temperature is too cold or too hot and the air is either humid or heavy with pollen. 

  • The secrets of sunshine

    As the days grow longer, Bo and Bear, two brawny brown Labs, don’t want to come inside after their sundown backyard romp. Sniffing down the fence line, pawing through pine straw and darting through any cracked gate or door, the two retrievers seem aware of something. Their owner doesn’t see, hear or even smell anything unusual, but apparently the dogs detect something she doesn’t.

  • It’s strawberry time again!

    I consider it a true sign of spring when local strawberries are available. By the numbers of people at the local pick-your-own patches I’m guess other people feel the same way.

    The season had a slow start with the colder temperatures and near freezing nights earlier in the year. But, according to Al Hight from Brunswick Berries, this week and next should be the prime season and, if Mother Nature continues to be favorable, we will have berries through Memorial Day. 

  • Facing garden challenges like weeds, insects and diseases

    Working with people to make their gardens better affords me the opportunity to see a lot of the challenges you’re facing with diseases, insects and weeds. Winter weeds, aphids and fire blight are the favorite topics for this week.

  • Influence peddling and bird watching, from the desk of Brian Slattery

    I have a couple callbacks to make in this week’s column, one involving our last episode and the other going way back to spring 2016.

    First off, my politicking last month paid off in an unexpected way.

    After putting out the word that the Beacon office has been a Girl Scout cookie-free zone — a cookie desert, some might say — for too long, a surprise delivery showed up here at the Beacon.

  • Brunswick County unemployment rate drops below 6 percent in March

    Brunswick County’s unemployment rate fell below 6 percent for the first time in 2018, reaching 5.6 percent for March.

    The unemployment numbers for Brunswick County remained above 6 percent since December 2017 but continued to drop for the second month after unemployment peaked at 6.9 percent in January.

    The unemployment rate dropped to 6.4 percent for February.

    A year-to-year comparison showed Brunswick County’s unemployment rate was lower a year ago at 5.5 percent in March 2017.