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Today's News

  • Morrill Act: 150-year anniversary

    By Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    Higher education in America was once a luxury for the privileged. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln changed that when he signed the Morrill Act, which established the nation’s land-grant universities and opened doors of higher education to more Americans.
    The act directed funding to agriculture, engineering and mechanical arts education, helping build the infrastructure that has kept us strong and helps feed the world today.

  • Tips for produce preparation

    By Myra Burgess
    Family Nutrition Program Assistant
    Expanded Foods & Nutrition Program
    Brunswick County Cooperative Extension

    •Begin with clean hands. Wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm water and soap before and after preparing fresh produce.
    •Cut away any damaged or bruised areas on fresh fruits and vegetables. Produce that looks rotten should be discarded.
    •All produce should be thoroughly washed before eating. Wash fruits and vegetables under running water just before eating, cutting or cooking.

  • Map denotes planting zones

    Most gardeners are familiar with the U.S. Hardiness Zone Map. Typically when consumers purchase plant material, the zones are listed on the tag of the plant.
    The 2012 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map is used to provide the gardener and grower with a guide for determining if a plant is likely to survive the winter in a garden or field. The map is based on the average annual minimum winter temperature, divided into 10-degree zones. The lower the number on the map, the colder the zone.

  • Go for the green on St. Patrick’s Day

    By Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension Service
    Brunswick County Center

  • Authentic Creole or Cajun gumbo requires okra or filé powder

    The Spanish gave Creole food its spices, and also paella, which was the forefather of Louisiana’s jambalaya. Cajun cuisine is characterized by the use of wild game, seafood, wild vegetation and herbs.
    Bouillabaisse, a soup that came from the Provence region of France in and around Marseilles, played a part in the creation of gumbo.

  • Community briefs

    Laser music shows at planetarium in March
    Music lovers won’t want to miss these laser music shows at Ingram Planetarium on March 16-17:

  • Calendar

    Thursday, March 15
    Weight Watchers, weigh-in at 9:30 a.m., meeting at 10 a.m., Southport Presbyterian Church, 1025 E. Moore St., Southport. For details, call (800) 651-6000.
    Rotary Club of Shallotte, meets 12:30 p.m. at Starz Grill at Planet Fun, Whiteville Road, Shallotte. Visiting Rotarians welcome.

  • Johnson-Thompson

    Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Christa Johnson and Andrew Thompson. The bride-elect is the daughter Mr. and Mrs. James K. Johnson Jr. of Bolivia. The prospective groom is the son of Dr. Sharon Thompson and Randy Thompson of Sunset Beach. An April wedding is planned in Wilmington.
     

  • Scores, highlights of area golf leagues

    The Beachcombers played a three-lowest nets tournament Friday at Crown Park. The winners with a score of 184 (-32) were Jim Beairsto, Hal Riebesehl, Jim Fitzner and Bob Smith. In second at 190 (-20) were Paul Michal, Ed Nocella, Fred Ortiz and Dick Cecil. Lowest gross: Reese Evans 82, Jim Fitzner 83, Hal Riebesehl 84, Bob Smith 85, Gary Gutheil, Bill McDavit and Jim Ritter 88, Paul Michal and Stu Cleveland 89. Lowest net: Hal Riebesehl 60, Bob Smith 63, Ed Nocella 67 and Jim Ritter 68. Hal Riebesehl was golfer of the week. He missed shooting his age by two strokes.

  • Waking up a snoozing golf course

    Those of you who are new to the game (in the last 20 years of so) probably don’t remember playing golf in the Carolinas during the winter months when all the grass was brown.
    That’s right, folks, brown. The greens were brown, the tees were brown, the fairways were brown, the rough was brown.