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Today's News

  • Business briefs

    Conservation reserve signup begins
    USDA Farm Service Agency will have a four-week Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) general signup through April 6, according to Coke Gray, the agency’s Brunswick County executive director.
    CRP has a 25-year legacy of successfully protecting the nation’s natural resources through voluntary participation, while providing significant economic and environmental benefits to rural communities across the United States.

  • Club briefs

    Elks to award service March 16
    Shallotte Elks 2854 in Shallotte will honor those who provided outstanding service to the town of Shallotte and Brunswick County at its annual awards dinner at 5:30 p.m. March 16.
    The dinner is open to the public and will take place at The Woodman of The World on Commerce Street in Shallotte. There is an $8 donation for adults and $4 for children younger than 10.

  • 4H’ers, On My Toes Clog for a Cure

    Clog for a Cure is a partnership between Jennifer Hoffman of On My Toes Dance Studio and Brunswick County 4-H, created by 4-H teen and On My Toes Dance Studio teen teacher Samantha Lawrence.
    The 4-H special interest group was developed by Lawrence to assist the Brunswick County 4-H Relay for Life team in raising awareness and collecting money for the American Cancer Society. Transportation and organization assistance is provided by dance mom Stephanie Bumgarner and Angie Lawrence, 4-H program assistant.

  • Religion briefs

    Spring concert and pancake dinner set
    Calabash Presbyterian Church will host the SBIC spring concert beginning at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 18. Local church choirs and groups, along with other area talent, will perform. A love offering will be taken and attendees are requested to bring non-perishable food items for the food pantry.

  • Sweet mystery of life resonates in the spirit

    If you are my age, and I suspect many are, you are familiar with the poignant song, “Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life.”
    I remember the first time I heard it. A blind man was bent over the piano pouring his heart into the keys, it seemed. Surely, he felt the mystery of being sightless in a sighted society. It was obvious that he knew well the longing, seeking, striving, waiting, yearning. He understood the burning hopes, the joy and idle tears that fall.

  • Morrill Act: 150-year anniversary

    By Tom Woods
    Master Gardener
    Higher education in America was once a luxury for the privileged. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln changed that when he signed the Morrill Act, which established the nation’s land-grant universities and opened doors of higher education to more Americans.
    The act directed funding to agriculture, engineering and mechanical arts education, helping build the infrastructure that has kept us strong and helps feed the world today.

  • Tips for produce preparation

    By Myra Burgess
    Family Nutrition Program Assistant
    Expanded Foods & Nutrition Program
    Brunswick County Cooperative Extension

    •Begin with clean hands. Wash your hands for 20 seconds with warm water and soap before and after preparing fresh produce.
    •Cut away any damaged or bruised areas on fresh fruits and vegetables. Produce that looks rotten should be discarded.
    •All produce should be thoroughly washed before eating. Wash fruits and vegetables under running water just before eating, cutting or cooking.

  • Map denotes planting zones

    Most gardeners are familiar with the U.S. Hardiness Zone Map. Typically when consumers purchase plant material, the zones are listed on the tag of the plant.
    The 2012 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map is used to provide the gardener and grower with a guide for determining if a plant is likely to survive the winter in a garden or field. The map is based on the average annual minimum winter temperature, divided into 10-degree zones. The lower the number on the map, the colder the zone.

  • Go for the green on St. Patrick’s Day

    By Cheryle Jones Syracuse
    Family and Consumer Science Staff
    NC Cooperative Extension Service
    Brunswick County Center

  • Authentic Creole or Cajun gumbo requires okra or filé powder

    The Spanish gave Creole food its spices, and also paella, which was the forefather of Louisiana’s jambalaya. Cajun cuisine is characterized by the use of wild game, seafood, wild vegetation and herbs.
    Bouillabaisse, a soup that came from the Provence region of France in and around Marseilles, played a part in the creation of gumbo.