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Opinion

  • By the time Hurricane Florence made landfall last Thursday night at Wrightsville Beach in neighboring New Hanover County, it seemed most of the people in Brunswick County had heeded official orders to evacuate for higher ground away from the coast.

    Some found shelter at West, North and South Brunswick high schools, where they were able to bring their pets with proper documentation. Others elected to ride the storm out at their homes.

    But many stayed behind to serve.

  • Before Hurricane Florence decided to head for our coastline this week and make a mess, state and local officials were encouraging residents to clean up the litter in their communities.

  • Last Friday, B.A.C.K O.F.F. of Brunswick hosted its first overdose awareness event at Shallotte’s Mulberry Park. The event coincided with International Overdose Awareness Day, held Aug. 31 to raise awareness and eliminate the stigma associated with drug-related deaths.

    It also served as an introduction to September’s observance as both National Recovery Month and Suicide Prevention Awareness Month.

  • In 2014, northern Brunswick County looked to its history to create the North Carolina Rice Festival as a new annual event.

    The festival was the brainchild of Cape Fear Wildlife Expo owner W.C. Lanier, who organized the two-day event with the North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce to recognize the cash crop that helped establish the county. It featured a rice-cooking contest, a beer garden for adults, a children’s entertainment zone, arts and crafts and live entertainment, plus a Youth Art Contest open to students in all Brunswick County schools.

  • The season may be over for four of our county’s Dixie Youth baseball teams, but they should be proud of what they accomplished this summer.

    The Leland National AAA 10-and-Under All-Stars won the state tournament, played at Waccamaw Park in Ash, with a shutout — and without losing a game — and earned the right to represent North Carolina in the World Series.

  • “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

    It is the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America and it has remained unaltered since our nation was established.

  • Technically, what the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office received July 28 from the Commission for Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies Inc. is accreditation.

    But for both the sheriff’s office and the community it serves, it is an honor.

    CALEA was established in 1979 as a credentialing authority through the joint efforts of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives, National Sheriffs’ Association and the Police Executive Research Forum, according to calea.org.

  • Sunset Beach was this close to seating a new mayor without controversy.

    Gregg Weiss, the lone candidate to apply for the post by the town’s deadline, seemed the ideal prospect for filling the vacancy left by Robert Forrester, who resigned to protest town council’s decision to fire Town Administrator Susan Parker.

    On June 6, Weiss appeared before all five members of town council to answer their questions and offer his vision for the town should they appoint him to fill the unexpired mayoral term through 2019.

  • Every summer, Brunswick County hopes for a safe summer without any loss of life in a rip current.

    In the first week of July 2013, when four people died within 36 hours after each of them was caught in a rip current, county and municipal officials thoroughly reviewed their policies, procedures and practices to ensure the very best efforts were being made to keep residents and visitors safe on our coast.

  • Sand collapsed on a man who was trying to tunnel between two 6-foot-deep holes he dug while vacationing at Cape Hatteras National Shore in the summer of 2014. He died after 15 minutes beneath the sand despite frantic efforts to rescue him.

    Although his is an extreme case of a common beach-going activity gone fatally wrong, Ocean Isle Beach officials do not want to see it repeated on their shores.

  • We are pleased to report no mishaps involving fireworks in Brunswick County during this year’s Independence Day celebrations. We are alarmed, however, by the number of fire deaths our state has had so far this year, including one at a mobile home in Leland on May 31 that killed the wife of a Winnabow firefighter. The cause of that fire has not been determined and it is unclear whether the residence had a functional smoke alarm.

  • Brunswick Riverwalk at Belville Park remains a work in progress pending the addition of a Cape Fear Raptor Center education facility and 1,480-foot waterfront boardwalk among other amenities. But it already boasts features like a 2,400-square-foot observation deck, 125-foot-long fishing pier, concert pavilion, a handicapped accessible mile-long nature trail and farmer’s market.

    The riverwalk park is a jewel for Belville and all of Brunswick County as a regional attraction since it opened in 2015.

  • Editor’s note: This editorial is by National Newspaper Association  president Susan Rowell, publisher/regional manager of The Lancaster (S.C.) News/Carolina Gateway, which is owned by the Beacon’s parent company, Landmark Community Newspapers Inc.

    There are two things you need to know about newspapers.

  • In 1993, Seattle changed its municipal code to

    classify potbellied pigs as pets instead of livestock and set a limit of one per owner. Sue Donaldson, the city councilwoman who sponsored the change, told radio station KUOW it was silly to waste resources on going after pig owners because of “one disgruntled citizen” who sought to have their owners charged with violations.

  • Brunswick County is not just for summertime tourists. Its ranking as the state’s fastest-growing county is proof.

    Yet residents and visitors alike remain unaware ample outdoor recreation opportunities it offers and has the potential to provide year-round, expanding the area’s economy.

  • Outward appearances indicate Brunswick County boasts a fit population engaged in golfing, kayaking, surfing and other outdoor activities that have necessitated the expansion of parks and similar facilities from Carolina Shores to Leland.

    The latest State of the County Health Report offers a harsh reality check.

  • According to the National Weather

    Service office in Wilmington, Memorial Day marked another day of record-breaking daily rainfall for May, thanks in large part to Subtropical Storm Alberto, the first named storm of this hurricane season, which does not officially begin until Friday, June 1.

    The NWS predicted much of the area could see two to four inches of rain Monday through Wednesday, saturating our already soggy area. Just after noon Monday, the NWS issued a flash flood warning for Brunswick County because of the rainfall brought by Alberto.

  • Memorial Day is meant to be a day

    of remembrance for those who died in the service of our nation. As the unofficial kickoff of summer, the holiday weekend also marks the beginning of what is known as the “100 Deadliest Days,” the period when teen traffic deaths historically rise as schools let out for the season, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

  • In 2013, the General Assembly voted to

    eliminate tenure for public school teachers and moved teachers instead to a system of one-, two- or four-year contracts, to be in effect by the 2017-18 school year. At the same time, the legislature left it up to the state’s school districts to figure out how to implement the Teacher Employment Law.

    Having tenure meant teachers had the right to appeal changes in their employment status. Under the law, all teachers with tenure are to lose it as of July 1 this year.

  • Now that it seems spring is finally here to stay, state health officials advise us to “Fight the Bite” by taking measures to reduce the risk of tick and mosquito bites.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the number of vector-borne diseases, or those transmitted though the bites of blood-feeding ticks, mosquitoes and fleas, has more than tripled across the country.